The Twenty SS20 Issue

Box & Blocks: Logotype

By Jo Phillips

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They’re the first brick with which a brand’s identity is constructed: logos are more than just a series of letters, they are veritable symbols. Never in graphic design are fonts, composition and spacing as important as in creating a logo.

Letters, what we usually think of as only the basic blocks that make up all communication of concepts, turn from the verbal to the visual. So, as soon as we’re familiar with it, instead of thinking of a logo as a word, we think of it as a single illustrated entity. Michael Evamy’s latest book, Logotype, takes us through more than 1,300 examples by more than 250 design studios, revealing an incredibly wide spectrum of possibility in a discipline that is much more complex than it seems.

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A logo needs to convey atmospheres, sensations, emotions in the most compact form possible. Design studios will find this book especially useful as a reference bible for their branding projects, but common mortals will also be fascinated by its clean layout and illuminating insight into our own means of perception.

The art team at .Cent immediately fell in love with it. Rachel, after flicking through it, starts by saying “this is very, very nice. It’s so interesting to read how a logo actually came about, what’s the story and the idea behind it”. A lot of the times, we might just think logos are pretty but there’s always a concept behind them.

“I love how the book includes also logos written in Hebrew, and Arabic”, she adds “all the logos you could possibly think of, really”. Rachel explains this is the kind of publication that makes you think about what a logo can really be: even just a letter or a blot if they’re transformed into something symbolic. And then she concludes by saying: “it smells really nice too!”

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Giacomo agrees: “When there’s so much material available out there, it’s hard to make a selection and give reasons for one’s choice, but they organised and divided the book in a very interesting way. Also, as soon as you see the cover designed by Pentagram, you know it’s going to be a good book…”

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Michael Evamy’s Logotype is out now for Laurence King Publishing. Get your own copy here 

Words by Chiara Rimella