The Twenty SS20 Issue

The Radiance of A Wedding

By Avneet Takhar

Radiance is a form of feeling that reflects great joy and love. Entirely genuine and sincere, radiance is a rare state of being that only a particular moment or occasion can capture. A wedding is one of these occasions, being a ceremony that is sacred and life-changing, based upon a foundation of something very earnest and real.

An Indian wedding is an event that depicts radiance through all the small touches to do with tradition and humble vows that are respectfully undertaken in either a mandir or gurdwara (depending on whether you are a sikh or hindu).

The vibrance of bright colours, concoction of musical instruments, abundance of family and friends and indeed the extravagance of how long a wedding lasts (usually up to a week including pre-wedding rituals), makes the wedding that bit more extraordinary and special for the couple.

Senthil Nathan (AKA Nathan G) is a freelance photographer who has contributed to publications such as Indian Express and Time Out. Since working as a photo journalist for the European Press Photo Agency of Chennai Bureau three years ago, he has gone on to work for big names like The Wall Street Journal and New York Times. His most outstanding work though, is his imagery of weddings.

He manages to capture this moment perfectly, with a bright light emanating from the couple’s hands, the picture appears simply glowing. With the wife’s mehndi-patterned fingers closed gently inside her husband’s fist, the shot is quite touching.

radiance senthil nathan 1
Photography by Senthil Nathan

Another one of his candid images shows a tabla (Indian drum) being played, with wedding guests surrounding the musicians; a mixture of happy and concentrated expressions on their faces.

Radiance senthil nathan 2
Photography by Senthil Nathan

It’s not only Senthil Nathan who is able to depict radiance through his lens. These images below may not be by a professional photographer, but they are still undeniably beautiful. Bride-to-be Sandy Sandhar is in the middle of being plied with haldi (turmeric yellow powder) as her miya is taking place, a tradition that holds the belief that this powder brings a glow to the skin before a bride’s wedding day. The delighted smiles of her and her relatives are simply luminous and proud; enough glow in itself.

sandy radiance miya
Miya

This powder pink image of her husband-to-be (his bride demanded he co-ordinate with her outfit), Jeeta Sandhar arriving elaborately to the gurdwara on a horse, with his posse of groomsman in salwar suits is something of a majestic display. There is an exuberant energy about the picture, exposing a highly excited atmosphere.

radiance jeeta
Jeeta

The radiance of a wedding isn’t something that can be replicated in any way, shape or form. A time for two loved ones to show their commitment and undying love for one another and celebrating with those closest to them is spectacular to be a part of.

Categories
#Art

; The Golden Age

I was eight years old and I was living in Courbevoie, France with my family and La Belle Époque (the Golden Age) was in its prime.