BLOOM: Life on the Move

By Shannon Brien

“To take advantage of serendipity, travel light”, says designer Jan Chipchase. The globetrotting, problem-solving consultant is alluding to values – mobility, sustainability, well-being and (self-) discovery – that lie at the heart of a cultural shift that has been taking place over the past decade: The desire to break both into and free of urban life.
– The New Nomads, ‘Going Global: Thoughts on the New Nomad Phenomenon by Shonquis Moreno‘.

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We have moved from the social tensions of the 70s, where nomadic life was embraced by hippies but looked down upon by the mainstream middle class and have since blossomed into society where a nomadic lifestyle is accepted and encouraged.

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The New Nomads: Temporary Spaces and a Life on the Move explores how this old trend has had an effect of the work of architects, city planners, product designers and employers worldwide. In this day and age we have the power to explore the world on our own terms and mobile housing provides the freedom to move the way you want, how you want and when you want. “Today’s creative class thrives off a lifestyle that enables it to work six months in a shared office in Berlin, spend the summer in a caravan in Chile, and show up in time for the next project at a temporary desk in New York”.

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In this global society we have more room global exploration, where we can create a lifestyle governed by our own rules. Nomadic life has created a corporate cultural sharing that is unlike anything we have seen before.